Inspired by Craft Beer, Distillers Debut Beer-Barrel-Aged Whiskey

Craft beer and whiskey have a lot in common, so it’s no surprise that distillers are experimenting with aging their whiskeys in barrels formerly used for craft beers. Distillers are now aging their whisky in barrels which were formerly used to store craft beers such as stouts or porters. These whiskies have more flavoursome and aromatic qualities than regular ones, and they’re infused by the rich flavours of the beer.

Craft beer in London has made such a huge impact on the beer industry that it is now inspiring a new trend in the whisky world. Aging spirits is not an unusual practice but aging whiskeys in barrels which were previously used to store premium brews has made this beverage unique among its peers. This modern approach proves how much power craft beer carries over the alcohol industry, thus leaving no doubt about its huge impact on today’s society and culture at large.

Whiskey is typically aged in oak barrels to add flavour and colour to the drink, but when bourbon makers started using wine casks instead of new oak barrels, they noticed that the flavours from the wood were more subtle than before. The process of aging whisky in a cask which previously held another alcohol is called “finishing”, and it can have a drastic effect on the flavour of the whisky.

Whisky aged in beer barrels, or what is being referred to as “beer-barrel ageing”, has been gaining traction amongst distillers for many years now. While this type of spirit may seem like an oddity at first glance, there are several important reasons why producers choose to use these types of casks from time to time.

Beer-barrel-aged whiskey has been around since at least 2014 when Balcones Distillery released Waco Blue Lightning, a Texas whisky made from rye malt barley.

One major reason is the fact that used whisky/liquor barrels have already done their job creating flavour and aroma profiles so they can be re-used which will help drive down costs even more than they already have over previous decades. Some examples of beer barrel aged whisky includes Balcones Distillery’s Brimstone, Kentucky Artisan Oak Reserve and Angel’s Envy Bourbon.

The process starts by soaking a barrel in water or alcohol overnight then filling it with freshly brewed beer. Distillers are also using barrels, similar to those used for wines and bourbons, to make these whiskies that add more flavours into their products. Distillers are adding flavour enhancers into their products by taking inspiration from craft beers as they use barrels commonly found in wineries & breweries such as chardonnay & blue corn bourbon for making malt barley rye whiskey aged six months prior to being bottled.

After letting it sit for two weeks, brewers remove the spent grains and rinse out any remaining sugars before filling it up again with more of the beverage. Once this step is done, the brewers move on to the fermentation process which typically takes between four weeks for ales and several months for lagers. During this time, yeast is added to start converting sugars into alcohol while also imparting its own flavours in the mix through fruity esters. At some breweries, you can actually taste different types of yeasts that are available depending on what type of beer they’re making, similar to using various strains of hops. Brewers often describe their beers as being either clean or complex with most craft brews leaning towards the latter due to longer fermentation times allowing more nuanced flavours & aromas from both yeast and malt barley.

The most popular type of beer being used is porters because they’re dark enough to give depth without adding too much bitterness or sourness to the final product.

Craft distillers are following the trend of craft brewers and making whisky that is aged in barrels previously used to store their favourite brews. These new whiskeys offer a unique taste profile by combining the best of both worlds, but they also come with an increased price tag because these barrels cost more than traditional oak casks. This interesting phenomenon offers consumers a chance to get their hands on some really special spirits and indulge in something different while simultaneously supporting local breweries or wineries, and this is in addition to the new craft spirit movement which produces some excellent beverages such as The Lakes Whisky.

The Information Marketing Primer For Helping and Healing Solo-Professionals – Part 4 – Free Report

In previous articles in this series, I talked about the importance of creating another stream of income in addition to your direct service hours. Information marketing is a natural fit for you as a solo-professional because of your extensive knowledge and expertise. It can prove to be a great source of additional income or replacement income should you cut back on direct service hours. I also discussed the importance of choosing your target market and creating an online presence.

In this article of the series, I will have you diving into the world of information marketing by creating your very first information product – the Free or Special Report. You may be asking yourself “If I’m supposed to be creating a revenue stream through selling my information to my targeted audience, why am I starting with a free product?”

There’s a good reason for it that I alluded to in previous articles…you have to build up your credibility and visibility and you have to build up your potential list of customers for your products. Having a blog is one way to create this credibility and visibility. Having a free report to offer from your static one-page or multiple page website is a critical way to increase your credibility and visibility and to drive people to your business. Making a sale directly to a “cold audience” isn’t easy, but it becomes much easier to make a sale if you are selling to people who are growing to know, like and trust you.

The Free or Special Report

There are two formats in which you can create your free or special report. One is in a written format and the other is in audio format. You are probably stronger in one or the other – writing or speaking – so start with the one that is best for you. But plan on having most of your information in more than one format because your customers most likely have their preferences for how they want to consume your information. I’ll focus on the written format in this installment and on the audio format in the next installment.

The first thing to do whether you are doing an audio or written free report is to decide the subject of this report. This is based on the target market you have chosen and what their most pressing needs are.

Let’s go back to an example in a previous installment of the nurse practitioner who specializes in working with children with ADHD. From your direct service work you know that two main concerns for parents are their child’s behavior problems and also their child’s low self-esteem. Your free report could focus on one or the other (not both) – managing behavior or helping raise their child’s self-esteem.

Or in the example of the acupuncturist who has a strong interest in helping people avoid diseases that are related to poor diet and lifestyle choices, your free report could focus on the factors that contribute to poor health or on the factors that contribute to good health.

The most important thing to remember in this report is that you are giving the “Why” and the “What”, but not the “How”…that is what they will have to pay for through your information products or your services.

You want to make sure that your free report is substantive but not so lengthy that it overwhelms your readers. A good minimum of pages is 10; maximum number is about 30 pages.

Make sure you give the free or special report a provocative or noteworthy title such as “10 Biggest Mistakes Parents of Children with ADHD Make…and How to Avoid Them” or “Seven Absolutely Essential Things You Have to Do to Not Die from Diseases Caused by Poor Lifestyle Choices”. These kinds of titles get people’s attention!

Here’s a simple format for the report:

State the problem or the source of pain for your targeted reader. (“As a parent, you find yourself frustrated and disheartened as every night turns into a battleground with your ADHD child…” or “Obesity is an epidemic in this country that is completely avoidable…”)

Add some real-life examples of this problem or pain – make it more real in their minds.

Explain why this is happening or what the causes are or what is the theory behind this problem.

Explain why what your readers have been doing to date hasn’t been working

Provide your solution without going into the “How” (“We know from several long-term studies that a behavioral program, coupled with family therapy can bring…” or “We know that eliminating processed foods, cutting out sugar, eating whole grains, fruits and vegetables…”)

Then give them the next step. For right now, as you do not yet have your information product developed, the next best step would be getting them to your email newsletter so that you can keep in touch with and eventually introduce your products to them. Once you do have a product, you will introduce it to your readers at the end of your free report. This change can be easily made when you are ready.

We will discuss the Ezine or email newsletter in Part Six of this series. Once you have your free or special report completed and your email newsletter in place, it’s time to start rolling out your information products to your audience. I’ll start presenting on how to develop these products in Part Seven.

What To Know Before You Buy Swordfish.

##1. Buy swordfish that is fresh

-You should always buy swordfish from swordfish suppliers that are fresh.-It’s important to know the difference between frozen and thawed before you purchase it, as well as where your fish was caught if possible. If you are buying from a market make sure there are no freezer burn marks or ice crystals on the fish that you buy because that means that it was frozen and refrozen.

-If you can see ice crystals, don’t buy it.-Make sure the swordfish is a nice pink color. If there are veins of brown or gray in your fish then do not buy it because this could be an indication that the meat has began to spoil..

##2. Look for swordfish with bright red flesh and firm texture

Look for swordfish with bright red flesh and firm texture. A firm texture and bright red flesh makes for good quality swordfish. Anything else would mean that it is not good enough to buy. If you can’t tell if there isn’t much information available about where thewas caught if possible., make sure there are no freezer burn marks or ice crystals on thethat youbecause that means thatand refrozen..

Due to their very high price, you can even get scammed by people who try to pass off some other type of fish as swordfish by cutting it into fillets. If you ar enot an expert you may not be able to tell the difference. To avoid this, make sure you know exactly what swordfish looks like and check for any inconsistencies in size or coloration of the fillets.

This is also one of the reasons why you should always buy your fish from a trusted vendor or from a fish market. You can always ask the vendor about where they get their swordfish and how it is shipped to them. The more you know, the easier it will be for you to tell if someone tries to scam or pass off another type of fish as swordfish.

Swordfish are also very sensitive to heat, so they should be cooked as quickly as possible.

##3. Avoid buying swordfish that has a fishy smell or looks too dry, slimy, or wet

-Discolored fish, dull flesh or brownish meat are indications that the fish is spoiled.-If you see white streaks in your swordfish then do not buy it because this could mean that the fish has begun to spoil and will taste bad when cooked. In addition it can cause severe illness if consumed.

-A swordfish that is stored at below 40°F will quickly begin to spoil, so keep an eye out for any ice crystals on the fish’s flesh or condensation inside of its package.-Swordfish spoils faster than most other types of fish because it has very little fat and no protective skin. If you eat swordfish when it begins to go bad then you can experience some serious food poisoning symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, vomiting etc…so stay away from buying old smelling fish!

The best way to pick a good quality swordfish is by looking for clear eyes, bright red gills that are free from slime and firm flesh with small scales near the tail end (if they still have them).

##4. How to buy swordfish

Swordfish should be bought from a reliable source.

Don’t buy from the back of trucks, or at seafood markets that have a lot of fish on ice sitting outside in the open air where there is no refrigeration.

When purchasing any type of fish or seafood, it is best to buy from a store with a high volume of sales. This way you know that the fish has been brought in fresh daily and sold quickly.

##5. What are the health benefits of swordfish

Swordfish offers many health benefits including:

-Omega-three fatty acids: Omega-three fish oil is known to help fight against heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. It also helps increase the good cholesterol which fights inflammation in your blood vessels and arteries, while reducing bad cholesterol levels that can cause blockages and hardening of the arteries.

Swordfish offers about 23 grams of protein per 100g serving size. Protein rich foods are perfect for building muscle mass after a workout or any type of physical activity since they provide your muscles with essential amino acids needed to build new cells. Studies show that consuming adequate amounts of lean proteins such as swordfish may help reduce body fat .